Daily Prompt: Later

The conflict in Yemen started two years ago. How does the country look two years later?

From UNICEF:

2 million children are out of school.

1,600 schools have been destroyed, damaged, or are being used as shelters.

A displaced Yemeni child, who fled Saada province with her family due to fighting between Shiite Huthi rebels and forces loyal to Yemen’s exiled President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi, eats bread at a school turned into a shelter in the capital Sanaa on August 19, 2015. The United Nations warned of a ‘developing famine’ in Yemen, where more than half a million children are severely malnourished, and pressed for access to its war-torn regions.

“The war in Yemen continues to claim children’s lives and their future,” said Meritxell Relaño, UNICEF Representative in Yemen. “Relentless fighting and destruction has scarred children for life. Families have been left destitute and are struggling to cope.”

80% of families are in debt.

Half the population lives on less than $2 a day.

More than 2/3rds of girls are married before age 18.

An outbreak of cholera in October 2016 has led to at least 106 deaths.

Close to half a million children suffer from severe acute malnutrition.

A malnourished Yemeni boy is attended to at a therapeutic feeding centre in the country’s third-largest city of Taez, on December 17, 2016. The UN children’s agency UNICEF says nearly three million people in Yemen need immediate food supplies, while 1.5 million children are suffering from malnutrition, including 370,000 with severe malnutrition that weakens their immune system.

Citing United Nations-verified data, the report “Falling through the Cracks” notes that in the past year alone:

  • The number of children killed increased from 900 to more than 1,500;
  • The number of children injured nearly doubled, from 1,300 to 2,450;
  • The number of children recruited in the fighting neared 1,580, up from 850 this time last year;
  • Attacks on schools more than quadrupled, from 50 to 212;
  • Attacks on hospitals and health facilities increased by one third, from 63 to 95.

Here’s to having better news to report on next year’s anniversary of the war three years later.

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