I was looking for something not current news to post today so was browsing Youtube and found some Queen of Sheba videos. This one is in two parts and somehow the eerie background music makes this point in history sound absolutely terrifying. Close the curtains and turn off all the lights while watching this for the full effect.

“She lives still today in the imagination and legend of both eastern and western cultures. The Arabs know her as Queen Bilqis, queen of a Pagan nation who finally embraced the greatness of Allah. Jews and Christians know her as the Queen of Sheba, the woman who was awed by Solomon’s devotion to one God. She appears among the Persians as the daughter of a Chinese king. But nowhere in the world is she revered and her legend more alive than in Ethiopia. Here the multifarious queen known as Makeda represents the fundamental myth of Ethiopian civilization. It is believed that she married King Solomon and bore him a son, Melelik. He was the first Ethiopian king and founded a royal dynasty that ended in 1974.”

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Cactus tree at Queen Sheba’s Palace.
Aksum, Tigray, Ethiopia, East Africa, Africa

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A pair of visitors stand looking at the well-preserved ruins of the palace of Queen Sheba
Aksum, Tigray, Ethiopia, East Africa, Africa

“Sana’a, now the capital of Yemen, is considered to be one of the oldest cities on Earth. 3000 years ago, it was a provincial city of Sheba. According to Arab legend, Sana’a was the first city founded by Shem, the son of Noah. 75 miles to the east lies Marib, the capital city of ancient Sheba.”

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Yemen, Sanaa, people walking on paving stone in front of buildings

Watch the video for more. Queen of Sheba: Is she from Ethiopia or Yemen? Two parts totaling about 22 minutes. I would say knowledge is power, but in the spirit of the banner across the bottom of the video knowledge is what’s up.

“Sheba’s remarkable irrigation system turned the desert into a lush land where grains, spices, and incense trees grew. And it was incense that made the Shebans rich. Some biblical scholars believe that the queen set out from her wealthy nation with the intention of opening trade relations with Israel, the rich gifts meant to pave her way with King Solomon.”

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In search of the Queen of Sheba in Marib, Yemen in May, 2001- Remains of the most important of Marib dams, that played a major role in the developing of this ancient city and of the kingdom of Saba. (Photo by Pool DEVILLE/AFSM/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images)

“Despite the legends and the firm belief of the Yemen people, Marib and its surrounding temples yield no indication that the Queen of Sheba or any powerful woman ruled here.  But there is evidence that women ruled in other parts of the Sheban empire. In the mountains of Yemen lie the remains of the royal city of Baynun. Ancient Arabic sources claim that demons built this city for the Queen of Sheba.”